Bear Flu

MISMS researchers identify the cause of sloth bear deaths at the Smithsonian National Zoo in Washington, DC: human-to-bear transmission of the 2009 H1N1 pandemic influenza A virus. Full article.

Impacts
  • An infection of a sloth bear with the pH1N1 (2009) influenza A virus is confirmed for the first time. Human origin of infection is strongly suspected.
  • Recurring pH1N1 epidemics in humans present an ongoing threat to a wide variety of animals, including threatened species.
  • Increased awareness of the risk of reverse zoonosis in zoological settings supports enhanced biosecurity measures, including annual influenza vaccination for staff with animal contact.

PLoS Comp Biol: drivers of spread of seasonal influenza in the US during 2002-2010

MISMS researchers analyzed fine-grain insurance claims data on influenza-like-illnesses over eight seasons in ~300 locations throughout the United States. Using statistical methods, they found that seven of eight epidemics likely originated in the Southern US, that influenza spatial transmission is dominated by local traffic between cities, and that seasons marked by novel influenza virus circulation had a particularly radial, localized spatial structure. The findings are in stark contrast to prevailing theories of influenza spatial transmission that suggest that transmission is favored in low humidity environments and that spread is a dominated by air traffic between populous hubs. The findings are published in PLoS Computational Biology.

Save the date for ANISE African influenza meeting, Nov 13-17, Antananarivo, Madagascar

6th ANISE (African Network for Influenza Surveillance and Epidemiology) Meeting 

Antananarivo, Madagascar

November 13 to 17, 2017

at Hotel Carlton

 

Please register and submit your abstract on-line (due August 15) to the meeting website: www.anise-network.org

The agenda is in progress, but we plan to hold plenary sessions from November 13- 15 and training workshops November 16-17.